Archive: 2018 / 05

7 Key Components of Fitness - SPEED (SKILLS)

In this blog we will (in between other bits n bobs) be very briefly introducing the 7 Key COMPONENTS OF FITNESS relative to triathlon and are the underlying principles used to guide the sessions in the ATP (Annual Training Plan) These include: Speed (skills), Power, Endurance, Strength, Muscular endurance, Flexibility and Body composition.

Component of fitness 1 _ SPEED (SKILLS)

In this context, speed is not the speed (velocity) of a person getting from one point to another, but how fast we move the limbs of the body!

In training, a typical speed session might cover: cadence in running/ cycling or stroke rate in swimming. Practicing at higher than usual cadence can also teach the muscles to work more efficiently. Try these:

Swim:

Thanks to the wonderful world of the web and swim smooth, see this article discussing stroke rate: Swimming stroke rate

Bike:

Spin-up drill.

When safe, during a ride, ideally on a flat terrain: shift to a low gear
and gradually increase cadence over a minute up you can’t maintain it (i.e. up
to the point before you start bouncing) then return to a normal cadence, leave
say 5minutes between each and repeat 5 to 10 times. This should not be a max
effort drill.

Run

Fast feet:

a drill that improves your
running cadence by teaching your leg muscles (mostly hamstrings) to fire faster
to turnover quicker and can be seen here: Fast feet

Watch this space for the
next Component of fitness: POWER

In this blog we will (in between other bits n bobs) be very briefly introducing the 7 Key COMPONENTS OF FITNESS relative to triathlon and are the underlying principles used to guide the sessions in the ATP (Annual Training Plan) These include: Speed (skills), Power, Endurance, Strength, Muscular endurance, Flexibility and Body composition.

Component of fitness 1 _ SPEED (SKILLS)

In this context, speed is not the speed (velocity) of a person getting from one point to another, but how fast we move the limbs of the body!

In training, a typical speed session might cover: cadence in running/ cycling or stroke rate in swimming. Practicing at higher than usual cadence can also teach the muscles to work more efficiently. Try these:

Swim:

Thanks to the wonderful world of the web and swim smooth, see this article discussing stroke rate: Swimming stroke rate

Bike:

Spin-up drill.

When safe, during a ride, ideally on a flat terrain: shift to a low gear
and gradually increase cadence over a minute up you can’t maintain it (i.e. up
to the point before you start bouncing) then return to a normal cadence, leave
say 5minutes between each and repeat 5 to 10 times. This should not be a max
effort drill.

Run

Fast feet:

a drill that improves your
running cadence by teaching your leg muscles (mostly hamstrings) to fire faster
to turnover quicker and can be seen here: Fast feet

Watch this space for the
next Component of fitness: POWER